16-year-old Nobel Peace Prize nominee Greta’s Thunberg is making history

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16-year-old Nobel Peace Prize nominee Greta’s Thunberg is making history

Brooke Crissman

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With new scientific findings on climate change shocking the world, many people have raised awareness on the issue in an attempt to prevent the looming environmental consequences from occurring, and one 16-year-old Swedish activist has gone above and beyond others and has gained world wide attention for it.

Last year, Swedish high school student Greta Thunberg held a solo protest outside of the Swedish parliament and began the current youth strike on climate change.

On March 15, thousands of students in over 100 countries left their classes in attempt to raise awareness on the issue, mainly thanks to Thunberg’s encouragement one year ago.

Since her first political action, she has addressed the United Nations Climate Change Conference and has given dozens of informational speeches on climate change in front of prominent audiences to encourage awareness.

While her actions by themselves are impressive for someone her age, her recent nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize by Norwegian lawmakers is record breaking. If she were to win, she would be the youngest recipient right behind women’s rights activist, Malala Yousafzai, who recieved her award at 17.

The courageous action taken by Thunberg are inspiring many to fight for such an important issue. Climate change is gaining attention because of activists like Thunberg, and if powerful government officials begin to listen, we will all be thanking those who risked their reputation for such an important issue.

Thunberg continues to encourage awareness all over the world on this critical issue and fuel the fire within the fight against climate change. While many believe that Thunberg has not done something impressive enough to be nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, her brave actions may have encouraged the policy change that could save the human race. 

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